Posts Tagged: Childrens Literature

Happy Dr Seuss Day! And here are 10 great Seuss quotes

Happy Read Across America Day! I for one will be staying in my pajamas and reading all day long (I have to– I’ve already taken the pledge). And how fitting to celebrate Read Across America Day on the birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel– the one and only Dr. Seuss! If you follow me on Twitter… Read more »

workspaces to inspire you

Where do you make art? write? compose? create? When I started out I thought it would be in a library. So I found the perfect one. It was very beautiful. And very silent. And very serious. And all I could think was, “GET ME OUT OF HERE!” I kept looking around at everyone writing great… Read more »

Hope beyond the walls of the world

We’ve had The Polor Vortex and Juno, The Storm Of The Century Of The Entire History Of NYC EVER! (not). It’s been frigid and freezing in New York City–and it was just such a winter a couple of year’s ago that inspired my brand new book. (And I can hardly wait. It’s coming out tomorrow!)… Read more »

why there’s no such thing as children’s books

“I don’t believe that I have ever written a children’s book,” Maurice Sendak once said. “I don’t write for children. I write–and somebody says, ‘That’s for children!’” Madeleine L’Engle said, “You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it… Read more »

limits and freedom

Imagine if you could do anything you want, and absolutely nothing was off limits, and your choices were unlimited, how would you feel? At first you think, yes! I’d feel great. But the reality is, if you’re like me, you don’t feel free. You feel trapped. There are too many things you could do so… Read more »

Picture Books and Margaret Wise Brown

“A book should try to accomplish something more than just to repeat a child’s own experiences. One would hope rather to make a child laugh or feel clear and happy-headed as he follows a simple rhythm to its logical end, to jolt him with the unexpected and comfort him with the familiar; and perhaps to… Read more »